Free Trade Agreement Norway China

Both the prime minister and the foreign minister expressed their hope that a free trade agreement between China and Norway can be concluded as soon as possible. “The bulk of Norwegian exports to China are for processing and load reduction, so a free trade agreement would have no impact unless these cod and mackerel are sold for China`s domestic consumption,” Fan said. “Trade is a basis for increasing total value added and offers supply opportunities to consumers. That`s why we support free trade agreements,” Astrid Aam, head of communications at salmon exporter Cermaq, one of Norway`s largest salmon companies, told SeafoodSource. “Today, the China-Chile Free Trade Agreement makes Chilean salmon cheaper for Chinese consumers than Norwegian salmon.” “Trade wars between major nations will affect us all,” he said. “It`s better for nations to trade with each other than to build walls against their borders, so Norway`s FTA negotiations with several countries are very important.” He said the Chinese side is ready to support trade while ensuring that food safety standards are met. The infrastructure project, paid for by Iranian oil and gas, will be a blessing for Iranian shrimp farmers, especially if trade is facilitated in yuan (Beijing`s long-declared goal) and not dollars. India, which has a similar deal with Iran to develop its Chabahar port, could also take the new route to the Chinese market if its current border tensions with China ease. While relations between Norway and China have thawed, Norway seems lately anxious to do more to finally conclude the free trade agreement, with Chinese construction companies winning or racing for major construction works in the Norwegian high-quality market. The Sichuan Road and Bridge Group is building a large bridge in Narvik and another Chinese construction company is offering for a port renovation in Kirkenes. Perhaps the most important is the arrival of a Chinese boat in the port of Narvik (after a record of only two weeks of sailing), presented by the Chinese media as proof of feasibility of the Chinese Polar Silk Road, which halves the delivery time to Europe. He also highlighted opportunities in other maritime affairs, including conservation and sustainable use of resources, culture, a tax treaty and winter sports. “Canada is a trading nation and our federal government of all political stripes has always made negotiating trade agreements an important foreign policy priority,” he said.

China is willing to cooperate with Norway to conclude negotiations for a bilateral free trade agreement as soon as possible, negotiate and sign documents establishing a “blue partnership”, strengthen cooperation in winter sports and other sectors, and create a fair, equitable, open and non-discriminatory business environment for enterprises of the two sides. A free trade agreement would harmonize the conditions of competition for seafood trade with China and facilitate trade by creating a bilateral framework for trade implementation, Fan said. However, the question arises as to whether China will end up significantly reducing tariffs on seafood, given that it is more dependent on imports for its seafood needs. “Good progress” will be made under a long-awaited free trade agreement (FTA) between China and Norway, a senior Norwegian official said in Beijing on November 29, 2019, insisting on continued dialogue and opening an attitude toward trade to address persistent concerns about protectionism. Critical contributions in China`s aquaculture and seafood industry are already duty-free: China`s State Council`s Tariff Commission announced on September 14 that franchises for U.S. suppliers of shrimp brood and fishmeal will be extended beyond September 16 when the exemptions expire. . . .